Nuts & Bolts: Lisa Goddard on “Building a DH Scholar”

Posted on Mar 31, 2016
April 6, 2016
4:00 pmto5:00 pm

The Electronic Textual Cultures Laboratory at the University of Victoria (http://etcl.uvic.ca/) invites you to attend the fourth of four sessions in the 2015-16 “Nuts and Bolts” of Digital Humanities series. These discussions focus on the pragmatics of DH research and tap into the experiences and expertise of people working on a variety of DH projects.

Details are below. Please share this announcement with anyone who might be interested in attending.

When: Wednesday, April 6, at 4pm

Place: University Club

Title: Building a DH Scholar

Abstract:
Academic Libraries across North America are building digital scholarship centres, maker spaces, and visualization labs. These new campus spaces offer student access to a spectrum of advanced tech like 3D printers, robotics, virtual reality gear, and visualization walls. They are billed as collaborative learning spaces, flexible teaching spaces, and advanced software training facilities. In this session we will discuss challenges in acquiring the technical skills needed to excel in the Digital Humanities, and consider how emerging Digital Scholarship Centres can help to address those needs. Is there an identifiable core skill set for DH scholars? What kinds of technology support would help DH students to feel more confident as researchers and tool builders? UVic Libraries are working to address some of these questions as we plan a Digital Scholarship Centre that will help students in all disciplines to build their digital skill sets and to incorporate tech into their learning experience.

Bio:
Lisa Goddard is the Associate University Librarian for Digital Scholarship and Strategy at University of Victoria. She holds degrees from Queen’s, McGill, and Memorial University, and is currently completing an MA in Humanities Computing at the University of Alberta. Lisa’s research interests include open access publishing, semantic web technologies, digital publishing and preservation, and the digital humanities.

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