Announcements

Winners of the 2012-13 “Digital Humanities Praxis Innovation Award”

The Electronic Textual Cultures Lab and the Maker Lab in the Humanities would like to congratulate Nina Belojevic, Alex Christie, Jon Johnson, and Katie Tanigawa, each of whom received the 2012-13 “Digital Humanities Praxis Innovation Award” at the University of Victoria (UVic).

For the 2012-13 Award, students from across the UVic were invited to submit projects (of all types, in a variety of formats) that demonstrate scholarly innovation through digital humanities research, teaching, learning, and communication. This year’s two successful projects met or exceeded the following criteria: 1) they were completed within the course of study for an 2012-13 undergraduate or graduate class in any department at the UVic; 2) they met the course’s stated learning outcomes or expectations; 3) they demonstrated an innovative use of digital technologies for research, teaching, learning, or communication; and, 4) they blended computational methods with a critical approach to a humanities question or problem.

Belojevic and Johnson’s collaborative project, “HyperLit: A Gameful Design Model for a Social Edition,” models a social reading environment that encourages deep attention to literature while also satirically prompting awareness of the digital economy’s tendency toward gamification. For English 507 (Spring 2013), Belojevic and Johnson (both MA students in English) developed a wireframe prototype and a speculative design video that use James Joyce’s Ulysses as a tutor text for their reading environment.

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Christie and Tanigawa’s collaborative English 507 (Spring 2013) project, “Dislocating Ulysses,” combines traditional literary analysis, archival research, geospatial mapping, and 3D modelling techniques in order to ask how data is (or can be) embodied and felt. Following the course objectives, Christie and Tanigawa (both PhD students in English) used materials from UVic’s Special Collections to develop a prototype for mapping readers’ geotemporal experiences of James Joyce’s Ulysses.

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Of note, aspects of both projects were publicly displayed during the “The Long Now of Ulysses summer exhibit in UVic’s Maltwood Gallery. Belojevic, Christie, Johnson, and Tanigawa have also presented research from these projects at York University (April 2013), Congress 2013 at UVic (June 2013), the Gaming without Frontiers event at UVic (March 2013), and the annual Modernist Studies Association conference (August 2013).

For the Award, each of these four students will receive a certificate of recognition, together with a 2014 Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) scholarship (valued at up to $3750). Please join us in congratulating this year’s four award winners for their innovative and inspiring research!

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